Past Grants

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Dallas CASA
Trained, court-appointed Dallas CASA (Court-Appointed Special Advocates) volunteers advocate for the best interests of abused and neglected children in protective care. CASA volunteers are a source of hope and support for child victims in foster care as they wait for the courts to decide where they may safely live. Funding from the Mavs Foundation will support programs to recruit, screen, train and support these volunteer advocates who provide this critical role in the child’s life.

Family Gateway
Family Gateway is the largest provider of supportive housing for homeless families and children in North Texas with programs for mental and physical health care; employment readiness and job training; financial literacy classes; and preschool and after school programs, GED preparation classes, and assistance seeking higher education. Funding from the Mavs Foundation will support expenses for housing, case workers and programs for the families they serve.

Mothers’ Milk Bank of North Texas
Founded in 2003, Mothers’ Milk Bank of North Texas accepts donated breast milk from carefully screened, healthy, breastfeeding mothers. Milk is pasteurized, tested, and frozen until prescribed to premature and critically ill infants in local NICUs. Funding from the Mavs Foundation will purchase testing equipment to ensure the milk is safe for these tiny, fragile newborns.

Nexus Recovery Center
Nexus Recovery Center is a substance-abuse treatment center specifically for women, including those pregnant or accompanied by children. The Mavs Foundation funds will provide support for the Child Development Center for children whose mothers are receiving treatment at Nexus. Because women can bring their children with them into treatment, Nexus is able to treat the whole family, and stop the cycle of drug abuse by giving children a safe and stable environment while teaching them healthy ways to handle emotions and the stresses of life.

Special Projects

Boys & Girls Clubs of Arlington (Basketball Court)
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Arlington give youth in need opportunities to reach their full potential through a variety of educational, social and recreational programs. The gym at the Don Kromer Branch in Southeast Arlington is a hub of the community, providing daily recreation, sports and healthy lifestyle programming for youth, sports leagues and community events. Funding from the Dallas Mavericks Foundation will be used to refurbish and renew the gym at the Kromer Branch.

Readers 2 Leaders (Computer Lab)
Readers 2 Leaders’ vision is to help all children in West Dallas read at or above grade level. The Mavs Foundation will create a new computer lab and Reading & Learning Center for the students. Readers 2 Leaders works with more than 400 students each year, and every one of them makes reading gains. On average, R2L students gain 11.5 months of reading skills during 7 months of instruction. This accelerated pace allows students to beat the odds and reach grade level so they can thrive in school.

S.M. Wright Foundation (Holiday Grant)
S.M. Wright Foundation received funding for toys for their annual Christmas in the Park event. The S.M. Wright Foundation began Christmas in the Park in 1998 in order to bring joy and celebration in South Dallas on Christmas Day. Today, the event is one of the largest holiday giveaways in North Texas, bringing gifts, food, entertainment and basic necessities of daily life to those in need.

Café Momentum
Café Momentum is a restaurant training platform that provides post-release paid internships for juvenile offenders to receive intensive culinary, job, and life skills training. Mavs Foundation funding supplied DART passes to the 100 interns, as well as covered urgent needs such as temporary housing deposits, utilities, clothing, groceries, toiletries, and emergency medical needs.

Focus On Teens
Focus on Teens (FoT) was created to compassionately serve the homeless or marginalized teen within the Dallas Independent School District. Funding from the Mavs Foundation purchased food, clothing and other essential items for homeless teens who visit the Focus on Teens Drop in Centers located on DISD high school campuses.

Dallas Holocaust Museum/ Center for Education and Tolerance
Mavs Foundation funding allowed 3,333 economically disadvantaged students from DISD to visit the Dallas Holocaust Museum/ Center for Education and Tolerance free of charge, as well as provided curriculum support for teachers for the program around the complex issues of human rights in the classroom.

Metrocrest Services, Inc.
Funding from the Mavs Foundation supported the Sack Summer Hunger program, a program that assists families in a time of crisis by providing a weekly distribution of food to cover breakfast, lunch, and snack over the nine weeks of summer. The grant provided food for 523 students for the entire summer resulting in 47,070 meals.

Special Projects

Kids-U (Reading & Learning Center)
The Mavs Foundation created a Reading & Learning Center for Kids-U, a free after-school tutoring program set up on-site in low-income apartment communities. The new Center is available for the Kids-U program at the Jackson apartment complex, serving 55 low-income students daily in the core learning subjects of math, language arts and reading.

Union Gospel Mission of Tarrant County (Computer Lab)
Union Gospel Mission is a shelter in Fort Worth dedicated to providing love, hope, respect and a new beginning for the homeless. The new Mavs Foundation computer lab provides access to perform job searches, build resumes, and complete job applications for residents at the shelter.

Parker’s Park Project (Basketball Court)
Following the explosion in West, TX in April of 2013, the city park, playground and basketball court were destroyed. Funding from the Mavs Foundation helped to rebuild the basketball court in the city park where kids and community members can now gather and play.

S.M. Wright Foundation ($10,000 Holiday Grant)
Funding from the Mavs Foundation will support the annual Christmas in the Park event to bring joy and celebration in South Dallas on Christmas Day. Attendees received groceries, clothing, household items, toys and, for 600 children, a brand-new bed set or bicycle.

Dallas Police Athletic League ($5,000 Special Project)
The Dallas Police Athletic League is a youth crime prevention program that utilizes educational, athletic and recreational activities to create trust and understanding between police officers and youth. Mavs Foundation funding purchased equipment for a portable, outdoor basketball tournament to be used throughout the community.

Dallas LIFE
Dallas LIFE received funding to provide meals for their children’s program. Dallas LIFE, the largest homeless shelter in North Texas, serves approximately 500 unduplicated children ages 0-18. A critical part of the many services provided is to serve three nutritious, well-balanced meals per day. Funding from the Mavs Foundation provided approximately 12,821 meals for the kids.

Essilor Vision Foundation, Inc.
The Essilor Vision Foundation received funding to support the expansion for the Kids Vision for Life program which provides disadvantaged students, within the Dallas school districts, with vision screenings, eye exams and new eyeglasses at no cost to their families. Essilor Vision Foundation’s mission is to eliminate poor vision and its lifelong consequences. Mavs Foundation funding supported Essilor Vision Foundation as it looked to expand its on-site operations and elevate the program’s vision health services from an independent school level to a community level.

Ronald McDonald House of Dallas
The Ronald McDonald House of Dallas (RMHD) received funding for a new passenger van to replace their current van that is 14 years old. RMHD is a home-away-from-home for families who have a seriously ill or injured child and must visit a Dallas area hospital for treatment. The new van provided by the Mavs Foundation will provide transportation to and from the area’s hospitals like Children’s Medical Center and Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for guest families of the Ronald McDonald House.

The Warren Center, Inc.
The Warren Center, Inc. received funding for therapy services for children ages 3-5 who are showing delays/disabilities in communications, social skills, motor/coordination and sensory processing. The therapy sessions for approximately 130 children will help them gain proficient communication skills so that they will be successful in school and function well in their homes, in the community and with their peers.

Special Projects

Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Fort Worth (Reading and Learning Center)
Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Fort Worth opens the doors to great futures for more than 13,000 amazing kids every year. The Eastside Branch welcomes youth from some of the most disadvantaged areas in Fort Worth with 67% of members living in single-parent homes and 87% participating in the free or reduced lunch program. The Mavs Foundation selected the Boys and Girls Club Eastside Branch to create a new Reading & Learning Center with new computers and space to address the modern learning needs of their kids ages 6-18 and gang-involved youth up to age 24.

Youth World Dallas Learning Center (Basketball Court)
Youth World Dallas Learning Center is a nonprofit youth organization that impacts children in need, inspiring hope for their future and relieving family economic burdens. Funding from the Mavs Foundation built a basketball court at their new location in a high crime, low-income area in South Dallas where more than 3,000 kids are served each year through after-school and summer programs and special events.

S.M. Wright Foundation (Holiday Grant)
S.M. Wright Foundation received funding to purchase toys for their annual Christmas in the Park event. The S.M. Wright Foundation began Christmas in the Park in 1998 in order to bring joy and celebration in South Dallas on Christmas Day. Today, the event is one of the largest holiday giveaways in North Texas, bringing gifts, food, entertainment and basic necessities of daily life to those in need. At the one day event, each child attending may choose a toy of their liking and each family has the opportunity to receive a brand-new bicycle. Each person that leaves goes home with groceries, clothing, household items, toys and for 600 children a brand-new bed set.

Friends of Wednesday’s Child
Friends of Wednesday’s Child (FWC) received funding to send 100 kids to camp. The mission of FWC is to bring hope and healing to children in foster care so they can overcome their past of abuse and neglect and claim their futures as confident, independent members of the community. Sending kids to camp helps level the playing field for foster children as research has shown that when foster kids experience sufficient “replacement experiences” they are able to override their past negative experiences of abuse and neglect and focus on healing, learning and maturing.

Genesis Women’s Shelter

Genesis Women’s Shelter and Support received funding for the Genesis Residential Children’s Program, which is designed to reverse the damaging effects of domestic violence on mothers and their children. The program provides a number of services for both mother and child including on-site day care and after school care, clinical counseling and case management, a K-12 school, and day camp (Camp G) during school holidays.

Reading and Radio Resource

Reading & Radio Resource received funding for their “Reading is Fun” Audio Book Libraries program, which would serve 35 schools in Dallas ISD that are classified as “failing schools” by the Texas Education Agency. These libraries serve children and youth struggling to read because of learning differences such as dyslexia, learning English as a second language, physical disabilities or vision impairments. Each Audio Book Library represents hundreds of hours of recording time. Reading & Radio Resource is the only provider of complete sets of audio books for Texas Bluebonnet Books, Texas 2×2 Books, Luminarias and Lone Star. Funding from the Mavs Foundation covered a portion of the costs of producing 35 Audio Library of 100-150 titles.

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital (TSRHC) received funding for their TSRHC Specialized Prosthetics Program, which provides specialized prosthetics to children with limb loss or difference due to congenital conditions, trauma or illness. An integral part of the hospital’s mission is not only restoring basic function that allows children to participate in daily living situations, but also expanding medical knowledge and patient care so that all children can reach their utmost and full potential. Mavs Foundation funding provided a portion of the costs for the equipment and supplies needed to fabricate specialized prosthetic limbs for children.

Special Projects
Fortress Youth Development Center (Reading and Learning Center)
Fortress Youth Development Center, Inc. received funding for the Fortress Literacy Center’s Reading and Math Labs. The Fortress Literacy Center is the after-school program of Fortress Youth Development Center and is need of new computers for its math and reading labs in order to continue to offer academic help and hope to the at-risk students of Southeast Fort Worth. The computer labs serve more than 80 students in pre-K through 8th grade daily. The Mavs Foundation provided 24 computers, 2 printers, new computer desks and teacher desks and general lab supplies.

Rainbow Days (Holiday Grant)
To help fund their annual Saturday with Santa Christmas Party- 10,000
Rainbow Days received funding for Saturday with Santa, an annual Christmas party for over 300 homeless children and parents who are residing in one of 24 different domestic violence centers, homeless shelters and transitional living centers in Dallas. Children and families enjoy a special holiday production and an afternoon of crafts, games, refreshments, a stocking filled with presents and a visit from Santa Claus. Mavs Foundation funding covered the costs of supplies, activities and presents as well as the cost of facility rental and refreshments and the transportation of children and families to and from the event.

S.M. Wright Foundation (Holiday Grant)
S.M. Wright Foundation requested funding for their annual Christmas in the Park event. The S.M. Wright Foundation began Christmas in the Park in 1998 in order to bring joy and celebration in South Dallas on Christmas Day. Today, the event is one of the largest holiday giveaways in North Texas, bringing gifts, food, entertainment and basic necessities of daily life to those in need. At the one day event, each child attending may choose a toy of their liking and each family has the opportunity to receive a brand-new bicycle. Each person that leaves goes home with groceries, clothing, household items, toys and for 600 children a brand-new bed set. Mavs Foundation funds were used to purchase toys for Christmas in the Park.

2012-13 $25,000 Grant Recipients

Captain Hope’s Kids
Captain Hope’s Kids received funding for its “Captain Hope’s Closet” program, which serves approximately 20,000 homeless youth annually ages 5-17 throughout North Texas. The mission of Captain Hope’s Kids is to meet the critical needs of homeless children, thus helping them to overcome obstacles such as exposure to drugs and alcohol, lack of stability and routine, health concerns, poor self-esteem, a limited perspective on life, abuse and neglect and the fear that the world is not a safe place. The closet program provides basic needs items for children living in the more than 42 shelters served by Captain Hope’s Kids. Funding went towards the purchase of school uniforms, shoes, school supplies and backpacks.

CitySquare
CitySquare recieved funding for their Nurture, Knowledge and Nutrition (NKN) program which is an ongoing program that services 12,000 children between the ages of 1-18 annually throughout the Metroplex. NKN provides snacks and meals to low-income children who are at risk of hunger. They provide year-round distribution of snacks and meals to these youth through a network of after-school and summer programs. Funding from the Mavs Foundation provided food to over 16,000 children through a network of 135 sites of after-school and summer programs.

Foster Kids Charity, Inc.
Foster Kids Charity Inc. received funding for Emergency Care Packages for the foster children in state custody. Foster Kids Charity Inc. serves 3,600 children 0-18 in the DFW area annually. These care packages would ensure that infants, children and teens receive new items to replace the ones that they were forced to leave behind or never had to begin with. These bags provide new belongings for children being cared for by the social welfare system. It is a free service for high risk children who have been abused or neglected or are foster kids inside the Texas foster care system. Each bag is a blue/white tote bag filled with brand-new, age and gender appropriate toys, books, a stuff animal, school supplies, clothing and personal toiletries. Each bag costs between $20-$50. Funding went towards the bags, supplies for the bags, shipping and delivery and snack bags.

Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance
The Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance (MDHA) is requesting funding for their Welcome Home program, which provides basic items that children and youth need when they leave homeless shelters and move into housing. Welcome Home’s purpose would fill in the gaps that these families’ housing provider cannot provide. Their focus would be on things that don’t get funded such as desks, books, sports equipment, and school supplies. The Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance serves approximately 150 children from infants to teenagers in Dallas County annually. Funding would be distributed as families move into homes provided through MDHA’s Continuum of Care partner agencies, including Family Gateway, The Family Place, Hope’s Door, Promise House, Rainbow Days and Vogel Alcove. MDHA will collaborate with these agencies to determine what the children and youth need when they move into housing and MDHA will then purchase these items.

Special Projects
Boys & Girls Club of Arlington (Computer Lab)

Boys & Girls Clubs of Arlington received a new computer technology room at its Kromer branch in south Arlington. This Club serves approximately 1,500 youth annually ages 6-18 in Tarrant County. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Arlington provides youth programs in core areas of education, career development, health, life skills, character and leadership, the arts and sports and recreation. With the new computer resources, the Kromer branch will be able to expand its educational programming into the realms of internet safety, basic computer skills such as word processing and spreadsheets, job search and career exploration. Funding would go towards the purchase of 20 computers & monitors and a one year license of Early Reading software.

Wesley-Rankin Community Center (Basketball Court)
The Wesley-Rankin Community Center (WRCC) received a Gymnasium Renovation, which will benefit the youth in the Los Altos community of West Dallas. For the past 110 years, WRCC has provided a safe place for local children to interact, learn and find positive outlets for their energy and interests. In 2011, the Board adopted a new plan to strengthen and support the educational performance of the community’s children by providing programming to promote health and wellness. Having access to a safe recreational facility will increase higher physical activity levels, as well as develop lifelong healthy habits. Funding would go towards flooring, paint, scoreboard, basketballs, rack cart, rims and nets.

Community Partners of Dallas
Community Partners of Dallas received funding for their Rainbow Room, which serves 10,000 children ages birth to 12 in Dallas annually and their mission is to ensure safety and restore dignity and hope to abused and neglected children by providing resources and support to the caseworkers of Dallas County CPS. Children often have nothing but the clothes on their backs when they are brought to Community Partners by CPS and the Rainbow Room program provides these children with items necessary to assure their initial support and safety. Funding went towards critically needed items for children including clothing, shoes, hygiene products, diapers, formula, car seats, etc.

Dallas Life
Dallas Life received funding for their Children’s Program needs. Dallas Life serves approximately 9,300 youth ages 0-18 in the Dallas area. Children come to Dallas Life with their parents traumatized and stressed by homelessness. The Children’s Program strives to bring order and fulfillment to their otherwise chaotic lives. While the children are at the shelter, they make sure they are fed, clothed, safe and comfortable; that they continue their education; have access to medical care and bring stability and enrichment to their lives. Funding provided cribs and mattresses, school uniforms and tennis shoes, furniture for the playroom and library, soft foam tiles for the nursery floor and funds for children to attend summer camps.

Gill Children’s Services, Inc.
Gill Children’s Services, Inc. received funding for Tarrant County children whose medical, dental, physical, social, psychological and/or educational needs have not been met by other community resources. Gill does not have several different programs or projects – they only fill the gap for any need a child has that no other agency can fund. Gill connects families with the treatment/service providers who offer Gill extremely discounted rates. 100% of the funds went directly to service. They have never turned a child away when they were the last resort.

Heroes for Children
Heroes for Children received funding for their Financial and Social Assistance Program, which is an ongoing project that will serve 700 families with children ages 0-22 battling cancer. Heroes for Children provides financial and social assistance to families, within the state of Texas, battling cancer. Funding went towards financial assistance to families to help with mortgage/rent, utilities, phone, gas, car payments and travel expenses to and from hospitals.

North Texas Food Bank
North Texas Food Bank received funding for their Food 4 Kids program, which serves 10,000 elementary school children per year for 40 weeks of the school year. Food 4 Kids give children backpacks filled with nutritious, kid-friendly, self-serve snack foods for themselves and younger siblings every Friday afternoon for the duration of the school year (or until the service is no longer needed). Kids return the backpacks on Monday to be refilled and picked up the following Friday. Funding from the Mavs Foundation served 121 children for an entire school year, providing a total of 4,836 backpacks and the nutritional equivalent of 19,432 meals.

Special Projects

The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club of Waxahachie (Computer Lab)
The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club of Waxahachie received a brand-new Reading & Learning Center. The Club hosts 130 youth ages 5-14 every day after school. The computer lab is used for Power Hour (homework assistance), researching post-secondary education and lesson planning for teachers. It is also open to parents to prepare resumes and seek employment.

Restoring Our Generation, Inc. (Basketball Court)
Restoring Our Generation, Inc. (ROG) received a new basketball court at their facility. ROG is a new organization that serves 720 kids annually in the Kessler Heights area. Their mission is to use a comprehensive approach to reaching out to the community, including programs and services aimed toward health, education, life skills and social enrichment. The new basketball court allows them to implement an Athletic Training and Education program to encourage youth to make healthy decisions.

Captain Hope’s Kids
Captain Hope’s Kids received funding for its “Captain Hope’s Closet” program. This program serves approximately 23,000 homeless youth throughout North Texas. The mission of Captain Hope’s Kids is to meet the critical needs of homeless children, thus helping them to overcome obstacles such as exposure to drugs and alcohol, lack of stability and routine, health concerns, poor self-esteem, a limited perspective on life, abuse and neglect and the fear that the world is not a safe place. The closet program provides basic needs items for children living in the more than 40 shelters served by Captain Hope’s Kids. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase of these items, which include diapers, wipes, formula, clothing, toiletries, school uniforms, school supplies and backpacks.

Central Dallas Ministries
Central Dallas Ministries received funding for its “Nurture, Knowledge and Nutrition” program. This program serves approximately 12,000 youth at 135 different sites throughout North Texas. The mission of Central Dallas Ministries is to build a genuine sense of community and alleviate the root causes of poverty in our neighborhoods. The Nurture, Knowledge and Nutrition program provides snacks and meals to low-income children who depend on the public school system for food. It provides year-round distribution of snacks and meals to these youth through a network of after-school and summer programs, which ensures a reliable source of nutrition outside of school, while also saving working families and single mothers a significant amount of money. The program provided approximately 675,000 meals and snacks to North Texas children in 2010. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went entirely towards the purchase of food, food distribution and supplies/materials.

CONTACT Crisis Line
CONTACT Crisis Line received funding to support its “Teen CONTACT” program. The program serves more than 9,000 Dallas-area youth ages 12-19, and indirectly serves tens of thousands more. CONTACT Crisis Line serves as a vehicle of hope for men, women and children who are struggling with depression, loneliness, substance abuse and relationship and financial issues, among many others. The Teen CONTACT program provides telephone crisis prevention services and distributes valuable resource information on teen-related issues to school counselors, youth groups and parents. These topics include diversity, leadership, communication, bullying, rebuking, anger, health, relationships, teen dating, violence, suicide and drugs and alcohol. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards printed materials and other direct program costs.

Essilor Vision Foundation
Essilor Vision Foundation received funding to expand its “Kids Vision for Life” program. The Essilor Vision Foundation, the non-profit arm of Essilor of America, helps to connect the dots between vision, learning, success and economic stability. The Kids Vision for Life program is primarily focused on low-income elementary school children who cannot see well and thus cannot learn effectively. The program offers screenings, mobile eye exams, quality lenses and frames, delivery and fitting, referrals and replacement of lost or broken glasses. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went to offset the direct costs associated with providing eye care and eyeglasses.

Irving Cares
Irving Cares received funding to stock the food pantry, which is a part of its “Emergency Assistance Program,” which serves more than 6,200 youth annually throughout the City of Irving. Irving Cares, in partnership with the Irving community, is dedicated to identifying and providing its residents with temporary assistance and training to promote self-sufficiency. The food pantry and financial assistance components of the Emergency Assistance Program provide direct relief during an immediate family crisis. Staff and volunteers interview then partner with clients to determine the best course of action, in an effort to make them a part of the solution. The Irving Cares food pantry serves approximately 560 households per month with nutritious groceries, and often serves families awaiting their food stamp benefits. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went to purchase food items, milk and hygiene products that are not donated.

Special Projects

Boys & Girls Clubs of Collin County (Basketball Court)
Boys & Girls Clubs of Collin County received a refurbished indoor basketball court at its McKinney branch. The gymnasium project was part of a larger renovation at the McKinney branch, which includes a kid’s lounge/media room, art room, kid’s computer lab, library, education center, commercial kitchen, teen career center, teen computer lab and teen lounge/media room. A refurbished gym enhanced the Club’s Triple Play program, which focuses on helping young people become healthy, active and learn new ways to handle stress, maintain a healthy body and form positive relationships. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase and installation of new Sport Court flooring and wall pads, basketball and volleyball lines and new logos.

Dallas Bethlehem Center (Computer Lab)
Dallas Bethlehem Center received new technology resources at its South Dallas facility. Dallas Bethlehem Center is dedicated to providing children with a positive environment for growth, regardless of their economic status or family situation. Its programs are aimed to keep parents connected with their children very early on, to increase their chances of developing the social, emotional, language and academic skills needed to success in school and reach their full potential. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase of paint and paint supplies, computer desks and chairs, computers, network installation and educational software.

The Family Place (Transportation)
The Family Place received a new van for the children’s program at its Safe Campus. The vehicle replaces a 1997 Dodge Caravan that served the transportation needs of 1,000 women, children and adolescents. The overall mission of The Family Place is to eliminate family violence through intervention and proactive prevention, extensive community education, advocacy and assistance for victims and their families. The Family Place’s programs include a 24-hour hotline, emergency shelter, supportive living program, child development center and community-based counseling. The van is used to bring children and mothers to the safety of The Family Place, as well as to support any off-campus activities including taking children to doctor or dentist appointments, summer camping activities, recreational and educational outings and more. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase of a new van, as well as title and other fees.

Buckner Children and Family Services
Buckner Children and Family Services received funding for Camp Buckner, a foster care camp for abused, neglected and abandoned children. Camp Buckner provides foster children ages 0-18 in Dallas County with the opportunity to enjoy a three-day camping experience with their foster families. Camp Buckner offers an array of normal camping activities including horseback riding, a ropes course, swimming, fishing and canoeing, and creates an atmosphere of openness and bonding between families who are often working through difficult situations. Camp is not only fun, but very therapeutic for the children as they heal physically and emotionally. Funding from the Mavs Foundation allowed 110 children to attend Camp Buckner during the summer of 2010.

Child Abuse Prevention Center
Child Abuse Prevention Center received funding for its Healthy Families program, which serves more than 200 at-risk teenage mothers and their babies (ages 0-5) in poverty stricken areas of Dallas County. The Healthy Families program seeks to prevent and reduce the rate of child abuse by teaching young families of newborns positive parenting techniques through in-home visitation and other services. Each family is assigned a Family Support Worker, who visits the mother’s home to provide intensive support to her from the prenatal period until the child is five years of age. Funding from the Mavs Foundation provided 1,000 parent counseling and education sessions.

Community Partners of Dallas
Community Partners of Dallas received funding to stock its Rainbow Room. The Rainbow Room serves more than 8,400 youth in Dallas County. Community Partners of Dallas helps protect and restore the well-being of abused and neglected children by providing resources to the caseworkers of Child Protective Services. The Rainbow Room provides critically needed items for children who have just that day been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect, or have been placed in the care of relatives. These critical needs items include clothing, shoes, hygiene products, diapers, formula, car seats, school supplies and school uniforms. Having easy access to these items decreases the likelihood of these children ending up in foster care. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase of the aforementioned critical needs items.

Parkland Foundation
The Parkland Foundation received funding to send burn patients to Camp I-Thonka-Chi, which means “a place that makes one strong or fearless, not afraid to face life.” Each year, Camp I-Thonka-Chi serves 65-75 youth ages 6-18 at Camp John Marc in Meridian, Texas. The camp provides an opportunity for children and teens to interact with others who have sustained burn injuries and to find a whole new level of acceptance. Campers see that they’re not alone and learn to be appreciated for their inner-self and not their physical appearance. Camp activities such as swimming, fishing, boating, a ropes course, horseback riding, volleyball, basketball, softball and arts and crafts are designed to enhance self-esteem, promote a sense of community and provide an opportunity for peer-to-peer support. Funding from the Mavs Foundation allowed 72 children to attend Camp I-Thonka-Chi during the summer of 2010.

Promise House
Promise House received funding for its on-site Emergency Youth Shelter. Promise House serves more than 7,200 youth ages 10-17 from Dallas and surrounding areas. Promise House offers one of the only no-cost youth shelters for runaway, homeless and at-risk kids in Dallas County, and is the only youth shelter in Dallas to provide on-site psychiatric care free of charge. The shelter is the core program at Promise House, providing crisis intervention and a safe place to stay for up to 16 young people at a time. For a direct cost of approximately $175 per night, Promise House provides food, clothing, shelter, case management, therapy, 24-hour supervision and educational/recreational activities. Funding from the Mavs Foundation provided 125 bed nights at the shelter, as well as a new pool/ping-pong table, indoor basketball game and sleeper sofa living room set for the shelter’s recreation room.

Youth Village Foundation
The Youth Village Foundation received funding for Project S.A.V.E. (Skills Advancement for Vocation and Education). The mission of the Youth Village Foundation is to meet the needs of young men in the Dallas County Youth Village and Medlock Residential Treatment Center by providing resources that will aid them in finding strength and determination to succeed and lead a productive life. The Youth Village Foundation is dedicated to helping juvenile offenders reach their law-abiding potential and diverting them from further involvement with the juvenile justice system. Project S.A.V.E. is a collaborative effort of local community partners to empower young men with opportunities for constructive change, education and possible employment. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards direct program costs, including the purchase of computer software/equipment, vocational training/books and nutrition/culinary art supplies.

Special Projects

Dallas County Juvenile Department (Basketball Court)
The Dallas County Juvenile Department received a refurbished indoor basketball court at its Juvenile Detention Center. The court will be utilized by more than 2,500 youth annually ages 10-17 in Dallas County. The mission of the Dallas County Juvenile Department is to assist referred youth in becoming productive, law abiding citizens, while promoting public safety and victim restoration. The refurbished basketball court provides an enticing reward to youth and challenges them to take control of their own behavior in a positive way. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase and installation of new flooring and wall pads, basketball and volleyball lines and new logos.

Dallas Life (Transportation)
Dallas Life received a new 12-passenger van for its children’s program. This program serves more than 10,000 youth annually (some duplicated) ages 0-18 in Dallas County. Dallas Life is the largest homeless shelter in North Texas, housing an average of 375 individuals daily, including 30 children per night. Dallas Life’s children’s programming and services include food, shelter, clothing and care in its medical, vision and dental clinic. Additionally, on-site amenities include an age-appropriate library, learning center, computer lab, playroom and outdoor playground. The new van allows Dallas Life to safely transport children to camps, after-school programs and other necessary appointments associated with being homeless. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went to replace a 26-year-old bus with a more reliable and safer vehicle.

Girls Incorporated of Metropolitan Dallas (Playground)
Girls Incorporated of Metropolitan Dallas received a new and improved playground at its south Dallas campus. The new playground equipment will be utilized by more than 200 girls annually ages 6-18 in South Dallas. Girls Inc. strives to inspire all girls to be strong, smart and bold by empowering them to take charge of their lives. This is accomplished through female-focused programs that encourage girls to discover their potential and grow in a sense of responsibility to self, family and community. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase and installation of new playground equipment, borders and wood fiber surfacing.

YMCA of Metropolitan Dallas (Computer Lab)
The YMCA of Metropolitan Dallas received new technology resources at its Park South Branch. The YMCA, the premier human development agency in North Texas, teaches values that help to strengthen and support families, help teenagers make the transition into adulthood, and create safe environments that allow individuals to develop total health. The YMCA’s values embrace the universal truths inherent in relationships with others, including respect, responsibility, caring, fairness, trustworthiness, and citizenship. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase of paint and paint supplies, computer desks and chairs, laptop computers, network installation and educational software.

Arlington Life Shelter
Arlington Life Shelter received funding for its “From Home to Home” children’s program, which is a crucial component of restoring homeless families to self-sufficiency. The program serves 250 youth annually ages 0-17 throughout the city of Arlington. The goal of the From Home to Home program is to provide a safe and stable environment where children can continue to learn and attend school while their parents are assisted through Arlington Life Shelter’s rehabilitative services. The program strives to provide stability and structure to children whose lives have been disrupted by homelessness and family crises such as a parent’s loss of employment, mental illness, or substance abuse problems. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards case management services such as counseling, child care, transportation, and job training, as well as miscellaneous maintenance and operations.

Captain Hope’s Kids
Captain Hope’s Kids received funding for the “Captain Hope’s Closet Program.” This program serves more than 9,700 homeless/underprivileged youth annually ages 4-18 throughout North Texas. The mission of Captain Hope’s Kids is to meet the critical needs of homeless children, thus helping them to overcome obstacles such as exposure to drugs and alcohol, lack of stability and routine, health concerns, poor self-esteem, a limited perspective on life, abuse and neglect, and the fear that the world is not a safe place. The closet program provides basic needs items for children living in the 40+ shelters that Captain Hope’s Kids serves. Funding from the Mavs Foundation helped with the purchase of these items, which include diapers, wipes, formula, clothing, toiletries, school uniforms, school supplies, and backpacks.

Central Dallas Ministries
Central Dallas Ministries received funding for its Transition Resource Action Center (TRAC) Program. Last year, this program served more than 800 youth ages 14-24 in 19 North Texas Counties. This particular request will serve approximately 100 youth ages 16-20 in the same region of North Texas. TRAC exists to help young adults get a job, enroll in college, establish a home, access health care, manage a budget, connect to a caring community of adults and peers, and plan for their future. This project will give young adults in foster care more of an in-depth look at colleges in the area and the opportunities that a higher education can provide. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards college visits (van/driver rental, food, gas), a college send-off event for 70 youth, and assistance with purchasing college books and supplies.

Dallas Furniture Bank
Dallas Furniture Bank received funding for the “Dallas Mavericks Children’s Furniture Project”, which will provide furniture relief to 180 Dallas County children ages 0-17 and their families. The Dallas Furniture Bank receives referrals from more than 30 Dallas/Fort Worth agencies to provide basic furniture to homeless children, families, and others in need, resulting in improved self-sufficiency, self-esteem, and long-term stability. Dallas Furniture Bank serves individuals and families transitioning out of homelessness, women and children trying to escape domestic violence, families below the poverty line, victims of natural disasters, and others requiring emergency assistance. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase of critically needed furniture items such as tables, chairs, beds, and cribs, as well pick up and delivery costs such as gas, maintenance, and insurance.

Head Start of Greater Dallas
Head Start of Greater Dallas received funding for its Early Childhood Math & Science Program. Annually, this program serves 1,060 children ages 3-5 from low-income families in Dallas County. Head Start of Greater Dallas provides preschool age children with the foundation of skills and knowledge they need to be successful in school and life by providing comprehensive child-development services including medical and dental care, education, nutritious meals, and social services. The goal of the Early Childhood Math & Science Program is to ensure that children leave Head Start with the foundation of skills and knowledge to succeed the two subjects throughout their academic career. Funding from the Mavs Foundation purchased comprehensive math and science curricula material kits and disposable cameras.

North Texas Food Bank
The North Texas Food Bank received funding for its “Food 4 Kids” program. This ongoing program serves 5,200 children annually ages 5-12 in 13 North Texas Counties. The North Texas Food Bank addresses the critical issue of hunger by securing donations of surplus, unmarketable, but wholesome foods and grocery products for distribution through a network of charitable organizations. The Food Bank passionately pursues a hunger-free community through Food 4 Kids by ensuring that children receive the nutritional food they need to grow, learn, and become productive residents of our community. Every Friday throughout the school year, children identified by school personnel as “food insecure” or “chronically hungry” receive a backpack filled with nutritious, kid-friendly, individual serving foods for themselves and their siblings. Funding from the Mavs Foundation provided 5,000 backpacks of food to 125 children during the 2008-09 school year.

Special Care & Career Services
Special Care & Career Services received funding for its Infant Mental Health Therapy program. In 2007, this ongoing program served 570 children ages 0-3 in Dallas and Denton Counties. Special Care & Career Services provides education, therapy, and training to children and adults with developmental disabilities so they can lead fulfilling lives in their communities. The Infant Mental Health Therapy program, which is an essential component of Special Care & Career Services’ Early Childhood Intervention program, serves children with developmental disabilities and/or delays such as vision impairments, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, autism, and spina bifida. Funding from the Mavs Foundation covered infant mental health therapy for 216 (622 total service hours).

Special Projects

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas (Basketball Court)
The Mesquite Branch of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas was the beneficiary of a refurbished indoor basketball court. This court allows the Mesquite Club to expand programming so that more than 500 at-risk youth and teens ages 6 to 18 throughout Mesquite and East Dallas will have a safe place to play. In addition, the court gives the Club the ability to offer programs that enhance youth interaction and development, allowing them to make healthy choices and avoid a wide-range of high-risk behaviors. Work completed by NexCourt of Arlington included installing 5,400 square feet of maple Sport Court tiles and new wall pads, repairing 6 different goal units, painting basketball and volleyball lines and putting in 5 full-color logos. The cost of the project and incidentals was taken care of by FOX Sports Southwest, Coca-Cola and the Dallas Mavericks Foundation.

ChildCareGroup (Playground)
ChildCareGroup received a new and improved playground at its Anderson Child Care Center in Garland. The Anderson Center serves 120 infants, toddlers, and preschoolers (ages 0-5) annually in Garland and Dallas County. Every day, ChildCareGroup offers family focused child care free of charge to more than 14,000 children from low-income households and thus has limited resources to pay for facility repairs and renovations such as this. Children are on-site 8-10 hours a day, so outdoor play and exercise are essential components of their program. Last year, the playground at the Anderson Center was removed following a state inspection that determined the equipment did not meet safety standards. Funding from the Mavs Foundation will go towards the purchase of new playground equipment and installation, paint supplies and materials, landscaping, and cleaning supplies.

Dallas Community Lighthouse (Computer Lab)
Dallas Community Lighthouse received new technology resources at its south Dallas Kids Campus. The Kids Campus programs serve 95-120 youth annually in grades K-8th that live in low-income apartment communities in Dallas. “Kids Campus” is a year round program that offers homework assistance, tutoring, technology building, and character building, all of which will help ensure that children complete their education. Dallas Community Lighthouse hopes to update the Kids Campus curriculum with the latest technology and an enhancement of the arts program. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went towards the purchase of computer desks and chairs, desktop computers, network installation, and educational software.

United Community Centers (Transportation)
United Community Centers received a new van for its “Awareness Changes Tomorrow” (ACT III) program. This ongoing program serves 238 unduplicated youth annually ages 12-17 throughout Tarrant County at three different centers. Each center is located in neighborhoods where over one third of the population lives below the poverty line. The ACT III program is dedicated to sharpening participants’ social and academic skills and to enlightening the emotional and physical well being of students through various activities. It channels youth from gangs, sex, drugs, and other deviant activities after school and during the summer to a healthy, fun, and enriching environment that grooms them for academic success, physical fitness, and leadership. Funding from the Mavs Foundation went to replace UCC’s 16-year-old van with over 210,000 miles with a more reliable and safer vehicle.

Community Partners of Dallas
Community Partners of Dallas received funding to help stock their “Rainbow Room.” This ongoing project serves more than 6,000 youth annually ages 0-17 throughout Dallas County. Community Partners of Dallas helps protect and restore the well-being of abused and neglected children by providing resources to the caseworkers of Child Protective Services. The Rainbow Room provides critically needed items for children have just that day been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect and have been placed in the care of relatives. Having easy access to these items decreases the likelihood of these children ending up in foster care. These critical needs items include clothing, shoes, hygiene products, diapers, formula, car seats, school supplies, and school uniforms. Funding from the Mavs Foundation was directed towards purchasing school supplies and school uniforms.

Family Place
Family Place received funding for new playground equipment at their facility. This project will serve 100 Dallas County youth annually ages 0-18 and their mothers, all who are participating in their transitional housing program. The playground, which will also include benches for the mothers, will be an essential element in helping them overcome the trauma of family violence and homelessness. The mission of Family Place is to eliminate family violence through intervention and proactive prevention, extensive community education, advocacy, and assistance for victims and their families. Family Place programs include a 24-hour hotline, emergency shelter, supportive living program, child development center, and community-based counseling. Funding went towards the purchase of a playground structure and benches, including delivery and installation.

Kidney Texas, Inc.
Kidney Texas received funding for Camp Reynal at Camp John Marc in Meridian, TX. This camp serves approximately 120 youth ages 8-16 throughout Texas. Camp Reynal is a one-week summer camp that provides an essential need for children with kidney disease by offering them an educational and recreational experience they can’t get anywhere else. Because children with kidney disease require daily medications, special diets, and medical treatments, they are often excluded from other camp experiences. Camp Reynal, which is the only camp in Texas that provides on-site kidney dialysis, strives to increase self-esteem and self-confidence, create a sense of independence, improve social skills, and offer a sense of hope. Funding covered the cost of camper fees, transportation, storage rental for dialysis chairs, and camper photography during the summer of 2008.

SpiritHorse Therapeutic Riding Center
SpiritHorse Therapeutic Riding Center received funding for horseback riding lessons/scholarships for children with disabilities. This project will directly impact 70 youth over the next year ages 1-17 in 9 North Texas counties. SpiritHorse provides free, private therapeutic horseback riding to children will all types of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities for one year on a weekly basis. They are the only center in America that provides all these services free of charge. Their curriculum is designed to help children improve motor, speech, behavioral, and social skills to cross boundaries set by doctors, therapists, and sometime parents. In addition to the actual horseback riding, each therapy session allows the children to participate in leading, grooming, and saddling their horse or pony. Funding from the Mavs Foundation provided weekly lessons for approximately 30 children for an entire year.

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children received funding to purchase adapted daily living and mobility equipment for patients undergoing Physical and Occupational Therapy (PT/OT). This project will serve 1,020 youth annually ages 0-18 throughout the state of Texas. Adapted daily living equipment refers to medical equipment that allows children to continue everyday functioning following surgery or a procedure. This equipment is crucial to patient outcomes and to their safety and comfort during recovery. The PT/OT Departments at Texas Scottish Rite have approximately 20,000 patient visits annually. They focus on helping children gain strength, coordination, and balance while putting these assets into motion to accomplish everyday tasks. Funding went towards purchasing toiletry and bath equipment, crutches, walkers, wheelchairs, car seats, and vest belts.

Vogel Alcove
Vogel Alcove received funding for their play therapy program for homeless children. This program serves approximately 100 youth annually ages 2-6 in Dallas. Vogel Alcove provides free quality childcare, social services, and developmental services for children living with in homeless shelters, domestic violence shelters, and transitional housing complexes. Their play therapy program strives to improve the social and emotional development of these children who have experienced trauma caused by domestic violence, homelessness, neglect, and abuse. Play therapists meet with each child 1-2 times a week for 20-45 minutes to monitor the child’s behavior and activities to determine the best way to guide them in understanding themselves, their reality, and their world.

YMCA of Metropolitan Fort Worth
YMCA of Metropolitan Fort Worth received funding for their “New Lives/New Beginnings Childcare” program. This ongoing program serves 500 teen parents ages 12-17 and their children ages 0-5 in the Poly/Como community in East Fort Worth. The program operates an on-site childcare center on the campus of Polytechnic High School to assist teen parents with quality, full-day childcare while they complete their high school education. While it is housed in a Fort Worth ISD school, the YMCA of Metropolitan Fort Worth administers the center. The center offers pre-natal/post-partum nutrition classes, positive parenting classes, and health and wellness opportunities as well as a support network of other teen parents.

Special Projects

Jeffries Street Learning Center (Computer Lab)
The Jeffries Street Learning Center received a new computer resource center courtesy of the Mavs Foundation. They service 250 youth annually in economically distressed areas of South Dallas. The Jeffries Street Learning Center serves multi-generation families by providing educational enrichment programs for both parents and their children targeted to improve their social and economic status with the ultimate goal of breaking the cycle of poverty. With new computer resources, they will expand their programming into the realms of internet safety, basic computer skills such as spreadsheets and word processing, and job search and career exploration. In all, the Mavs Foundation provided 12 state of the art computers and related equipment, a server, a network printer, a new paint, new carpet, new desks and computer chairs.

Oak Cliff YMCA (Basketball Court)
The Oak Cliff YMCA was the beneficiary of a refurbished outdoor basketball court. This court will service more than 500 youth annually ages 5-17 in South Dallas and Oak Cliff. The YMCA, the premier human development agency in North Texas, teaches values that help to strengthen and support families, help teenagers make the transition into adulthood, and create safe environments that allow individuals to develop total health. The YMCA’s values embrace the universal truths inherent in relationships with others, including respect, responsibility, caring, fairness, trustworthiness, and citizenship. In all, the Mavs Foundation will provide a new all-purpose Sport Court floor, new backboards, new rims, and new goal units. The court featured six hoops on five different courts (one full-court and four half-courts).

Bryan’s House
Bryan’s House/Open Arms received funding for the installation of new carpet and baseboards inside their facility. The carpet is being installed in the residential area, day care, and administrative offices. Bryan’s House provides residential services and day care for children with AIDS and supports families affected by HIV and AIDS. Bryan’s House serves approximately 834 youth annually of all ages in the Greater Dallas Metropolitan area. 80% of Bryan’s House’s clientele live below the poverty line, and 90% are African-American and Hispanic.

Child Care Group
Child Care Group received funding for a facelift for 4 of their 6 child development centers in the Dallas area. These 4 centers serve 670 infants, toddlers, and preschoolers annually in the economically challenged areas of Oak Cliff, South and East Dallas, Irving, and Garland. Child Care Group offers family focused child care free of charge and thus has limited resources to pay for facility repairs/renovations. Funding went towards the purchase of cleaning supplies, paint, painting equipment, flooring, shelving, rugs, and landscaping materials.

DallasCASA
Dallas CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) received funding to provide advocacy to abused and neglected children in the city of Dallas from newborn to 18 years of age. Dallas CASA provides volunteer advocates to approximately 980 victims annually; funding from the Mavs Foundation is helping to provide advocates to 14 of these children. They recruit, train, and supervise these court appointed volunteers to represent the best interests of these children by finding them safe, permanent homes as quickly as possible while protecting them from further harm.

Parkland Foundation
The Parkland Foundation received funding to send burn patients to Camp I-Thonka-Chi, which means “a place that makes one strong or fearless, not afraid to face life.” Camp I-Thonka-Chi serves 65-75 youth annually ages 6-18 at Camp John Marc in Meridian, TX. The camp is an opportunity for children and teens to interact with others who have sustained burn injuries and find a whole new level of acceptance. Camp activities such as swimming, fishing, boating, a ropes course, horseback riding, volleyball, basketball, softball, and arts and crafts are designed to enhance self-esteem, promote a sense of community, and provide an opportunity for peer-to-peer support. Funding from the Mavs Foundation covered the camp fees for 71 patients across the state of Texas.

Promise House
Promise House received funding for their on-site Emergency Youth Shelter. The shelter serves 400-600 youth annually ages 10-17 in Dallas and surrounding areas. The shelter offers no-cost, teen-focused housing for 20 runaway, homeless, and at-risk youth at a time for up to 30 days. Last year, the shelter offered 5,183 total bed nights for a direct cost of $96.61 per night. This cost covers food, clothing, shelter, case management, therapy, 24-hour supervision, as well as educational and recreational activities. Funding from the Mavs Foundation provided 259 bed nights at Promise House.

Wednesday’s Child Benefit Corporation
Wednesday’s Child Benefit Corporation received funding to provide tutoring sessions for foster children. This project will serve 20-25 youth annually ages 6-18 in Dallas, Fort Worth, and 17 surrounding counties. Wednesday’s Child is the only organization that provides funds to fulfill the specific needs of North Texas foster children. Funding provided a total of 1,000 tutoring sessions for these abused and neglected children.

Women’s Center of Tarrant County
The Women’s Center of Tarrant County received funding for their Victimized Children Program. This initiative serves 50 youth annually ages 0-18 living in Tarrant County. The Victimized Children Program provides a spectrum of services designed to promote the healing and recovery of children who have been sexually abused or assaulted, or have experienced other violent crime. The primary service is accessible, age appropriate clinical counseling (individual, group, play therapy) provided by licensed counselors. Regular sessions are supplemented with special circumstance sessions such as hospital visits during child rape exams and accompaniment through criminal justice proceedings. Funding provided a total of 417 therapy sessions for approximately 50 children and their families.

Special Projects
Boys & Girls Club of Arlington (Computer Lab)

The Boys & Girls Club of Arlington received a new computer lab at its Southeast branch. This club services 800 youth annually, ages 6-18 in Arlington and Mansfield. With new computer resources, B&G Club of Arlington will expand their educational programming into the realms of internet safety, basic computer skills such as spreadsheets and word processing, job search and career exploration, and digital arts including graphic design and digital photography. In all, the Mavs Foundation provided 14 state of the art computers and related equipment, a server, a network printer, new desks and computer chairs and a new paint job courtesy of Glidden/ICI Paints.

Dallas County Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (Basketball Court)
The Dallas County Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program was the beneficiary of a refurbished gymnasium courtesy of the Mavs Foundation. This gym services 300 youth ages 10-17 on a monthly basis in Dallas county. The Dallas County JJAEP serves as the last stop for troubled teens that have behavioral issues before being placed in a residential facility by the Juvenile Justice System. In all, the Mavs Foundation, along with Fox Sports Net, Sprite, and NexCourt, provided a new all-purpose Sport Court floor, new backboards, rims, and goal units, and new bleachers.

Presbyterian Hospital of Plano (Mavs Themed Room)
Presbyterian Hospital of Plano received funding for the creation of a Dallas Mavericks Room on the pediatric floor of the hospital. The pediatric wing at Presbyterian serves 750 youth annually of various ages from the Plano, North Dallas, Frisco, Carrollton, and The Colony areas. The funding has gone to renovate a patient room in a way that will provide comfort through artistically designed and colorful surroundings. This room would be Mavs and basketball themed room that will provide strength and encouragement to children in their recovery and fight against illness. Funding was specifically used for exterior and interior room painting, furniture, flooring, and fabrics.

Caring for Children Foundation of Texas, Inc. (Vaccination Van)
The Caring for Children Foundation of Texas received funding from both the Mavs Foundation and the Woodall Foundation for the creation of a Care Van sponsored by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas. The Care Van is a mobile immunization unit that provides flu shots and other infectious disease prevention services to youth that don’t otherwise have access to such resources. This van will serve approximately 10,000 youth in the DFW area annually, ages 4-18. The van’s design has incorporated both the Mavs Foundation and Woodall Foundation logos and is fully equipped with all necessary medical supplies.

Captain Hope’s Kids
Captain Hope’s Kids received funding for the Captain’s Hopes Closet Program which serves approximately 80 children ages 4-18 during a six month time frame. The program provides homeless children with basic items needed for them to attend and stay in school, including backpacks, school supplies and school uniforms. They provided these supplies to families residing in 39 local shelters.

Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center (DCAC)
DCAC received funding for the DCAC Therapy Program which helps approximately 45 child abuse victims. Each therapy session costs DCAC about $50 and the grant would provide roughly 500 sessions or an average of 12 sessions for 42 child abuse victims. The focus of the therapy program is to help child abuse victims heal from their abuse and restore their emotional functioning through highly specialized therapeutic counseling. The therapists work on complex issues stemming from abuse including trust, shame, embarrassment, safety and rebuilding their self-esteem.

Family Gateway
Family Gateway received funding for the Playground Project which would serve 400-450 youth ages 2-17 in Dallas per year. Family Gateway Center provides comprehensive services to children whose families are in crisis: counseling, temporary housing, job search and placement assistance, transitional living apartments and community transition services. Currently, the children at this facility play in a fenced, enclosed courtyard with 25 year old playground equipment. They are going to pour a new concrete subsurface over which a child-safe surfacing will be installed and install new playground equipment and a basketball goal. This allows the children to spend more time outside and have more mental and physical stimulation.

Low Birth Weight Development Center (LBWDC)
LBWDC received funding for classroom furnishings for the new center currently being built. LBWDC serves approximately 185 high-risk, low birth weight infants from birth to age three and their low-income, mostly Hispanic parents. Through social service support, they seek to reduce the incidence of repeat teen pregnancy as well as repeat low birth weight deliveries. The grant was used to furnish the infant/toddler classrooms and provide learning materials for the children.

Texas Home Access Fund
Texas Home Access Fund received funding for ongoing home access projects for individuals who could not otherwise afford it. HAF works on the homes of 2-3 families per month, serving close to 30 children per year. The majority of their projects so far have been for families with children under 19. This year, HAF has set a goal of 40 projects. Their mission is to improve the quality of life and increase independence for physically challenged individuals and their families. The families are located through organizations such as Scottish Rite Hospital for Children. This is the only organization of its kind in North Texas.

Special Projects

Dallas Bethlehem Center (Basketball Court)
Dallas Bethlehem Center received a new gymnasium floor. The gymnasium serves 2400 youth in South Dallas during the year. The gym will provide a safe haven for the youth of South Dallas and help in the prevention of teen pregnancy, gang affiliation, truancy and delinquency. Dallas Bethlehem Center is dedicated to improving the quality of life for the children in this community by providing holistic services for each child’s educational, physical, emotional, social, moral and spiritual needs.

Buckner Children and Family Services of North Texas (Computer Lab)
Buckner Children and Family Services of North Texas received new computers for the Vickery After School Program & Computer Lab. More than 60 youth ages 5-17 participate in Buckner After School Programs and teen programs each day. The majority of these youth are from low-income, primarily Hispanic families in East Dallas. These programs provide at-risk youth a healthy, constructive alternative to juvenile delinquency. They use the computer lab to complete homework assignments and to use educational enrichment software and English as a Second Language software. The grant provided 11 new computers with updated software as well as program support.